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Home Office

The Home Office is the lead government department for immigration and passports, drugs policy, counter-terrorism and police.

The department works to counter terrorism, cut crime, provide effective policing, secure the UK's borders and protect personal identity.

The Home Office is headed by the Home Secretary and five other Home Office ministers. It's one of the largest government departments and has a fairly complex structure.

Visit the Home Office site

HOME OFFICE NEWS

May to speak on border agency relaxations
One question is whether the changes allowed anyone into the UK who posed a risk to national security

UK Border Agency ''dumped'' 124,000 cases
To hide the fact that the agency had lost track of the cases it used the phrase ''controlled archive'' to identify the material

Immigrant child detention is ''excessive''
Data suggests ''we now need to focus on detention at points of entry'', says home affairs committee chair

PM: UK 'committed' to fight slavery and human trafficking
Ministers set to launch new anti human trafficking measures on Anti-Slavery Day in October

Cameron looks to target forced marriages
Forcing someone to marry should become a criminal offence in England, Wales and Northern Ireland, says PM

LATEST HOME OFFICE FEATURES

Christine BeddoeThe business of slavery
Christine Beddoe highlights the training needed to address some of the difficulties for public sector agencies in tackling child trafficking and abuse – particularly relevant in light of the potential increase resulting from opportunities presented by the Olympics

Duty of Care: 'Recognise, Respond, Refer, Record'
Neil Blacklock and Nicola Sharp highlight the important role of the employer, and more particularly HR, in supporting employees who experience, or perpetrate, Domestic Abuse

Safe and secure?
Public Service Events' Public Security and Counter Terrorism conference on 28 September will look at key issues for the safety and security of UK citizens. Conference chairman Frank Gregory considers the reshuffling of border controls